Eldar Pegasus rune Eldar Pegasus rune

eldar pegasus

scratchbuilt superheavy grav tank

The Eldar Pegasus is a scratchbuilt superheavy transport. Its design was originally inspired by a tiny image of a vehicle from a piece of artwork of the Lugganath craftworld, first published in the 5th edition Warhammer 40,000 rulebook. The name was chosen based on a reference on page 37 of the 4th edition Eldar codex to a "winged steed" ridden by the Eldar god Asuryan.

date: 2011 - present (work-in-progress)
components: 2x Eldar Falcon kits, 1x Wave Serpent kit, 1x Forge World Type II Falcon conversion kit, 1x Forge World Phantom Titan D-cannon, 1x Forge World Phantom Titan torso, 1x Forge World Firestorm targeter, 66x custom laser-cut anti-grav vanes (2mm acrylic), 1x metal Fire Prism sensor, 1x plastic Fire Prism rear hatch, 1x Crimson Hunter Pulse Laser, 1x Crimson Hunter Bright Lance, 1x Crimson Hunter Starcannon, 1x Wraithknight Scatter Laser, 1x Wraithknight Shuriken Cannon, 2x Imperial Knight 160mm oval base, 2x transparent flying stands, 1x Eldar War Walker ruined scenery element, 1x Forge World Eldar Hornet pilot, plasticard (various thicknesses), Green Stuff, White Milliput, sytrene tubing (various diameters), neodymium rare earth magnets (various sizes), brass rod, cork

see also:
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Lugganath Craftworld artwork unnamed Eldar superheavy vehicle close-up
1. This is a close-up of the artwork that inspired this project. Though it is not particularly detailed, the (unnamed) vehicle has some distinctive features, namely the triple engine intakes and the low, wide profile. The design I came up with uses this as inspiration rather than trying to recreate it exactly.
Original image Games Workshop.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus design concepts
2. My first rough concepts and notes (the proportions in the sketch are very, very wrong!). I originally based the design around a double-width access ramp, however I quickly realised that in order to carry signficantly more units than a Wave Serpent, the Pegasus would need a much larger troop compartment and, correspondingly, a larger access ramp. The ramp on the Pegasus ended up three times the width of a standard Falcon ramp.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus design concepts
3. More detailed design concepts and sketches. I incorporated a large fin at the rear of the vehicle, mimicking those found on the "Type II" vehicles of the Forge World Eldar range. All of my other grav tanks have these Type II hull extensions.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus parts
4. When dealing with a conversion of this scale, I find it helpful to lay out the various components to get an idea of the rough shape and size. It's also useful for experimenting with different combinations of bits.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus parts
5. A later, more developed layout of the pieces, once I'd started work on some of the individual components.
Some of the raised gems were removed from each of the identical ramps to avoid repetition and make the completed, larger ramp seem more cohesive. Green Stuff was used to fill in some of the recessed details and blend the ramps together. The ramp hinges were carefully pinned and glued together. Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus rear access ramp
6. The rear access ramp was the first component of the conversion that I assembled, though it was later revised and the central protrusion removed. I decided from the outset that the Pegasus would have a fully-detailed interior, with a magnetised access ramp.
This triple frame was made by pinning the smaller doorframes from two Falcons and one Wave Serpent kit together. The central frame was cut down to make it narrower. Each bit of detailing on the hull was changed in some way to avoid obvious repetition of the same designs. Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus rear access ramp surround
7. The rear access ramp and the surrounding frame were the first parts that I worked on, since their size and shape would inform decisions about much of the rest of the vehicle's layout.
These corners were cut from the hull of one of the Falcon kits; plasticard was then used to form the rest of the base. Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus hull bottom work-in-progress
8. Once the rear of the hull had begun to take shape, I put together the base. This is a ventral view - the reverse side forms the floor of the troop compartment. This section would later be reduced in size.
The tracks in the hull were scored into the plasticard using the point of a needle file. These oval-shaped holes echo the design of the fin on Forge World's Type II Scorpion model. This gap in the centre was originally included to allow the taller middle section of the ramp to swing open unobstructed. Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus rear fin work-in-progress
9. Next I started working on the large "Type II"-style rear fin, cut from a single piece of 2mm-thick plasticard. My approach with this project was to build individual components to be glued together later; like building the pieces for a kit in effect. Each piece informed the shape and size of the next piece, eventually producing a coherent result whilst still allowing lots of dry-fitting and room for correcting mistakes.
These grav plates were taken from the underside of one of the Falcon kits. Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus rear fin underside work-in-progress
10. The underside of the rear fin. The design quite closely mimics that of the fin on the Scorpion.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus design concepts
11. Further design sketches. At this stage the proportions and details of the Pegasus were becoming more defined.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus rear access ramp work-in-progress
14. The rear of the Pegasus begins to take shape.
This smaller fin was taken from a Forge World Type II Falcon conversion kit. These sloping fins were made using plasticard, with white Milliput used to create a smooth, curved join with the flat topside. Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus upper hull section work-in-progress
17. This piece is part of the upper hull. The shape is meant to appear similar to the Type II Wave Serpent turret (albeit much larger).
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus wing tip work-in-progress
18. One of the wing tips.
The anti-grav ribbing was taken from one of the Falcon kits. Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus wing tip underside work-in-progress
19. The underside of the port side wing tip.
The cockpit was cut from the upper hull of a Falcon kit. Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus cockpit work-in-progress
20. The cockpit begins to take shape.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus cockpit underside work-in-progress
21. The underside of the cockpit, showing some of the plasticard internal construction.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus troop compartment work-in-progress
23. The body of the Pegasus starts to come together as the rear hull is joined to the floor of the troop compartment. At this point, it is already as long as an entire Wave Serpent.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus design concepts
24. Some more design sketches of various aspects of the Pegasus.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus wing design concepts
25. At this point I started tracing existing parts of the Pegasus to create 1:1 scale sketches for new components. This was the original design for the wings - once I'd cut out a template, I shortened the wingspan slightly to keep the Pegasus well-proportioned. Eventually the wings were scrapped entirely in favour of smaller fins.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus underside design concepts
26. A detailed, 1:1 scale concept sketch of the underside of the Pegasus. At this point it became apparent that the unusual, undulating edge of the forward prongs would mean that I'd have to make custom anti-grav vanes, since I wouldn't be able to re-purpose those from the Falcon kits.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus forward hull work-in-progress
28. The forward hull continues to be assembled. This section of the Pegasus alone is as wide as a Type II Scorpion is long.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus forward hull underside work-in-progress
29. The underside of the forward hull.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus reduced troop compartment work-in-progress
31. I decided that the troop compartment was too big, so I reduced its size significantly. Despite this, the footprint is still over 8 times larger than that of the interior of a Falcon.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus mid-construction mock-up
32. A mock-up of the Pegasus. The reduction in size of the troop compartment improved the proportions greatly.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus mid-construction mock-up
33. Another, more complete mock-up of the Pegasus. At this point the wings pylons were shortened as I wasn't happy with the proportions.
These recessed areas of detailing were taken from around the rear access ramps of the Falcon kits. Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus upper hull
34. The upper hull takes shape. This would remain removable for much of the project to allow the interior to be painted, until it was eventually glued in place and blended properly into the rest of the vehicle.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus wing underside
37. The underside of the port wing tip takes shape.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus front hull
38. The front half of the vehicle starts to come together. Thanks to a lot of pinning and building components separately, the construction is satisfyingly heavy and solid.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus underside work-in-progress
40. A shot showing some of the internal construction of the underside detailing.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus underside detail
41. A later image showing the same section after some work has been done on it.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus upper hull detail
42. Part of the upper hull, early on in construction. The resin parts came from a Phantom Titan D-cannon.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus work-in-progress
43. The Pegasus starts to come together, with most of the major components now glued together.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus interior work-in-progress
44. A shot of the work-in-progress interior with the upper hull removed.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus underside work-in-progress
45. The underside of the Pegasus.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus work-in-progress mock-up
46. Another work-in-progress mock-up. After much consideration, I decided to scrap the supporting pylons connecting the "pontoons" as the design wasn't working as well as I'd hoped. By bringing these "pontoons" closer to the main hull, I feel that the vehicle appears more cohesive and less ungainly than it did before.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus upper hull panel lines
47. Close-up showing the paths of the planned panel lines on the upper hull.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus upper hull
48. The detailing on this section of the upper hull was virtually complete at this point.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus Scatter Laser
50. The weapon mount under the cockpit can accommodate the usual options of Twin-Linked Shuiken Catapults or a Shuriken Cannon. I also wanted the option to have a Scatter Laser; this was assembled using parts from the Shuriken Cannon from the Wave Serpent kit. This was eventually replaced in favour of a different style of weapon mount that could accept several different heavy weapon options.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus force field projectors
51. These components will form the force-field projectors and are designed to look like scaled-up versions of those found on the Wave Serpent.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus engine detail
52. A close-up shot of the detailing around the port-side engine cluster.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus underside concept sketch
53. An updated concept sketch for the underside.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus underside work-in-progress
54. A work-in-progress shot of the underside. Most of the detail was constructed using different thicknesses of plasticard. The design takes some inspiration from the Scorpion.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus underside work-in-progress
55. An updated shot of the underside. The port side is virtually complete at this point.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus dorsal view
56. A dorsal view of the Pegasus, with most of the panel lines completed and only some minor detail work on the starboard side of the vehicle left needing attention.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus aft view
58. A rear view of the Pegasus, with a Warlock for scale. At this point the design of the ramp was queried and after some discussion on Warseer, I decided to change it.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus and Warlock scale comparison
59. Another angle of the Pegasus illustrating the scale of the vehicle.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus rear access ramp concept
60. This Photoshop concept for the revised rear access ramp design proved the most popular among the Warseer posters - fortunately, it was my favourite one too!
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus fins
62. After much deliberation, the problametic and ungainly wings became fins, similar to those on the Type II Scorpion and Cobra (albeit larger).
The generator is made from the barrel of a Phantom Titan D-cannon, cut lengthways. Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus removable roof section and generator
63. The raised section of the upper hull now contains the generator necessary to power the Pegasus's shields and electromagentic pulse weapon.
When complete, these circular recesses will represent the emitters for the Pegasus's electromagnetic pulse weapon. Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus underside
64. An updated WIP shot of the underside, which is almost complete at this stage.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus size comparison with Scorpion and Night Spiiner
66. With the Pegasus's dimensions all but finalised, now seemed as good a time as any for a gratuitous size-comparison photo. The Pegasus is pictured with a Type II Scorpion and a Night Spinner. The Pegasus is 14" long, 15" wide, 3" tall and weighs around 620g. It's quite big.
The original styrene master. This 3mm-thick wedge of styrene was used to keep the vanes regularly spaced as they were glued in position. Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus anti-grav vanes work-in-progress
67. Rather than try to cut 66 fiddly anti-grav vanes by hand, I created a single "master" from styrene that I then scanned and turned into vector artwork. This was then sent to Fenris Games, who used my design to laser-cut them from 2mm-thick acrylic.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus anti-grav vanes
68. The anti-grav vanes on the forward prongs start to take shape.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus anti-grav vanes
69. The port-side prong, with 33 vanes glued in place. Some gap-filling work with Milliput will be needed to blend them in properly with the rest of the hull, but even at this stage I'm delighted with the effect.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus anti-grav vanes
70. Both prongs completed.
These vanes have been completed. These vanes still need some work. Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus anti-grav vanes
71. Work begins on filling in the gaps and blending in the vanes with the hull.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus force field generator
72. Some further conversion work on the generator in the upper hull.
The component is held in place with magnets, allowing it to be removed for easier storage and painting. Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus force-field projector
73. The first of four "Wave Serpent"-style force-field projectors on the upper hull.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus rear view
75. An updated rear view of the Pegasus.
I used a classic Fire Prism sensor to match my Falcon hulls and Scorpion. Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus sensor array
77. I updated the sensor array so that it better blends in with the rest of the hull.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus force field projectors
79. The force field projectors take shape.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus ventral view
81. An updated underside view of the Pegasus. Most of the remaining work on the exterior comes down to gap-filling and tidying up (and finishing the two remaining force field emitters).
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus dorsal view
82. Another view of the upper hull. The starboard side still needs some work and some panel lines need to be finished, but most of the detail has been completed now. The interior is the single biggest area left to complete at this point.
Eldar Pegasus dorsal technical drawing
83. With the exterior design virtually complete at this stage, I created this technical line drawing of the Pegasus in Adobe Illustrator, in the style of the diagrams seen in the Forge World Imperial Armour books.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus fins
84. The completed fins.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus fins underside
85. Underside of the completed fins.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus force-field projectors
86. Completed upper hull force field projectors.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus engines
87. Completed detail on the starboard engine cluster.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus anti-grav vanes
88. The anti-grav vanes on the underside of the portside forward prong are now completely finished, after much gap-filling with White Milliput.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus fins upper hull detail
89. The ceiling of the hold has been updated with some raised design work.
The top of the walls have been bevelled so that they slope inwards slightly. Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus interior WIP
90. An updated shot of the Pegasus's interior space. Gaps have been filled and it is now ready for detail to be added. Once the interior and the (currently) removable upper hull have been painted, the upper hull will be glued on so that I can blend it in with the main body of the Pegasus. I toyed with the idea of leaving it removable, but the gap around the edge distracts from the design and spoils some of the lines.
The weapon mount is made from a cut-down, hollowed-out section of the plastic Fire Prism's rear access ramp component. Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus magnetised weapon mount
91. I decided to change the weapon mount under the cockpit, replacing the standard Falcon weapon mount for something akin to the secondary weapon mount on the Lynx. It can now accept several different magnetised weapons.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus magnetised weapon options
92. These are the magnetised weapon options for the Pegasus. From left-to-right; Bright Lance, Pulse Laser, Starcannon, Shuriken Cannon and Scatter Laser (the Eldar Missile Launcher has been omitted as the Pegasus has two of those already). This style of magnetised weapon is compatible with my Lynx and Crimson Hunter.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus magnetised weapon options
93. Some close-ups showing the different weapon options in situ.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus magnetised force-field projectors
94. After breaking one of the fragile force-field projectors on the forward prongs (and not for the first time) I decided to magnetise them all instead.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus magnetised force-field projectors
95. The magnetised force-field projectors.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus pulse wave generators
96. An electromagnetic pulse wave is emitted from these generators under the hull. The detail work on these has now been completed and they will be painted separately before being glued in place.
Eldar Pegasus colour scheme
97. After much deliberation, I have settled on this design as the colour scheme for the Pegasus (though the final design may differ slightly once I see how it looks on the model). The central area is a dark grey, which echoes the dark mid-section of the unnamed vehicle in the original artwork that inspired the project (seen at the top of the page).
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus fin paint scheme
98. An important milestone - the first component to be painted.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus fin underside
99. Underside of the (mostly) completed fin.
Scratchbuilt Eldar Pegasus dorsal view
100. An updated work-in-progess shot of the Pegasus. All of the detail on the upper hull is now finished. The interior and underside are nearly complete at this point and work has begun on the scenic base(s).
Eldar Pegasus rune
101. The rune for the Pegasus. This combines elements of the Falcon, Wave Serpent and Swooping Hawk runes.
Eldar Pegasus concept artwork
102. I drew some rough concepts for the interior and the flying base. This also shows various alternatives for the Pegasus rune before I settled on the final design.
Eldar Pegasus interior WIP
103. I sketched out the design for the floor using pencil.
Eldar Pegasus floor rune design
104. The centrepiece of the floor design is this oval section featuring the rune for the Pegasus, which I etched into the plasticard.
Eldar Pegasus floorThe ribbed floor was made by individually glueing shaped lengths of 0.8mm diameter styrene to the floor. Eldar Pegasus floor
105. The completed floor. The ribbed sections echo the design of the access ramp - I wanted that design to carry through.
Eldar Pegasus wraithbone ribs
106. These are the wraithbone ribs for the interior of the Pegasus. Eldar craft are constructed around a skeletal frame of psychically-grown wraithbone and are often described as having rib-like protruberances running along their length. These were cut from plasticard that was then filed and sanded down. They will be glued in the interior.
Eldar Pegasus interior WIP
107. The interior continues to take shape and the wraithbone ribs have now been glued in place.
These wall panels were made from sections of plasticard. Eldar Pegasus wraithbone ribs
108. A close-up shot of the wraithbone ribs on one side of the interior.
Eldar Pegasus roof
109. A shot of the completed interior roof. Some minor changes were made to the decorative elements to accommodate the wraithbone ribs.
Green stuff Eldar gems
110. These gems were made from Green Stuff, using a mould to make them (fairly) uniform in appearance.
Eldar Pegasus pilot
112. A close-up of the pilot. This design of pilot comes with the Forge World Eldar Lynx & Hornet models and I much prefer it to the older designs from the Falcon kit.
Eldar Pegasus anti-grav vanes
113. The starboard anti-grav vanes have finally been finished and are now blended in properly.
Eldar Pegasus underside detail
114. A close-up of the finalised underside detail.
Eldar Pegasus interior
115. The completed interior.
Eldar Pegasus interior cockpit hatch
116. A close-up shot of the back wall of the interior, featuring the access hatch into the cockpit and a command station with various controls and screens.
Eldar Pegasus interior detail
117. A view of the enclosed interior.
Eldar Pegasus interior detail
118. A different view of the interior, with the roof in place. The interior and the underside of the roof will be painted before the roof is glued in place and blended into the outer hull.
Eldar Pegasus assembled
119. Construction of the Pegasus was completed on 11th June 2015 - over 4 years since I started it in January 2011.
Eldar Pegasus underside
120. An underside view of the fully-assembled Pegasus.
Eldar Pegasus rear elevation
121. Rear elevation of the Pegasus.
Eldar Pegasus rear view
122. A rear view of the completed Pegasus. Although it is large, it is still very low and wide, which I think helps to preserve the Eldar aesthetic and not make it appear too bulky or ungainly.
Eldar Pegasus side view
123. A side view of the assembled Pegasus. The silhouette is quite typical of Eldar tank designs but I think it still looks quite distinctive.
Eldar Pegasus undercoated
124. The Pegasus has now been undercoated and is ready to be painted in its entirety.
Eldar Pegasus flying base
125. Work continues on the flying base, with the craters taking shape. White Milliput was used to sculpt the torn landscape.
Eldar Pegasus flying base
126. The scenic base is now complete, with the exception of the magnetic top that will connect with the underside of the Pegasus.
Eldar Pegasus flying base
127. Alternate view of the scenice base.


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